Exhibitions Old

CURRENT

Cao Fei: Shadow Plays

September 16 - November 21, 2015

Shadow Plays is the first Los Angeles solo exhibition of influential Beijing-based artist Cao Fei. Bringing together two of the artist’s landmark projects, the exhibition explores the artist’s investigations of the intensities and peculiarities of contemporary urban life in China. 

Cao Fei creates universes in her works—surreal dystopias and fantastic utopias inspired by the rapidly changing social and economic conditions of her immediate environment. Her work is marked by a keen understanding of global popular culture and the deep psychological impact of new technologies; articulating cultural shifts with an abiding sense of playfulness.

Haze and Fog (2013) is a meditation on alienation among the burgeoning middle class of present-day China. In a vast apartment complex, quiet tension accumulates through glimpses of the strange daily existence of its inhabitants and workers, refracted in the literal haze and emotional fog of what the artist calls the "over-imaginative reality" of 21st Century Beijing. RMB City (2007-2011) is a virtual metropolis developed by Cao Fei’s avatar, China Tracy, within the game Second Life. RMB City became a site for experimentation and collaboration where the historical, simulated and real mingled. RMB City Planning (2007-2011) showcases its development over the course of five years. People's Limbo in RMB City (2009) is a series of dream-like scenarios, quotidian activities, and social interactions that unfold in RMB City as the avatars of Karl Marx, Chairman Mao, Lao Tzu, and a Lehman Brothers executive, among others, create a new social space.

Cao Fei: Shadow Plays  is organized by The Mistake Room and curated by Kris Kuramitsu, TMR Deputy Director and Senior Curator. 

The Mistake Room’s programs are made possible thanks to the generous support of its Board of Directors; Big Mistake Patron Group; Mistake Patron Group; Director’s Council; and Contemporary Council. Special thanks to the Fowler Museum at UCLA. In-kind support is provided by House Beer. 

 

PAST

Milena Bonilla: Low-Intensity Operations

April 10 - June 13, 2015

Low-Intensity Operations is Colombia-born, Amsterdam-based Milena Bonilla's first solo show in the United States. The exhibition brings together, for the first time, various bodies of work produced by Bonilla over the past decade that trace interactions between nature, politics and cultural production. Since the early 2000's, Bonilla's work has explored the dichotomy of the Aristotelian categories of Physis (nature) and Logos (reason). An impossible desire to exert control over this relationship results in political armatures that, above all, seek to limit interactions between systems of living entities. Through a rich repetoire of Marxist references, Kafkian absurdity, and scientific witchcraft, Bonilla opens spaces of revolt to stand against this structural separation between the master and the beast. By using a heterogeneous lexicon that joins science, literature, economy and architecture, her work generates uncanny maps and improbable free zones where every surge becomes a sort of insurgency. In this tension between macro-political brutality and pervasive gestures of natural and linguistic resistance, Bonilla confronts our biased considerations distinguishing life, thought and action. Bonilla has articulated an expansive narrative through her projects, which this exhibition makes legible for the first time. Low-Intensity Operations stages her installations, including two newly commissioned works, as if they were chapters of a single book about life-form, power, territory-making and language-presenting them as a connected exploration. 

 Milena Bonilla: Low-Intensity Operations is organized by The Mistake Room and curated by Victor Albarracin, TMR's 2014-2015 Curatorial Fellow.

The Mistake Room’s programs are made possible thanks to the generous support of its Board of Directors; Big Mistake Patron Group; Mistake Patron Group; Director’s Council; and Contemporary Council.

 Special thanks to Lorena Espitia, Margarethe Drexel, Mondriaan Fund and the Armory Center for the Arts.

Photo Credits: Kelly Barrie. Copyright 2015. The Mistake Room. 

 

TMR Benefit Exhibition: The Silence of Ordinary Things 

March 28 - May 9, 2015 

Conceived as a visual essay woven from a multiplicity of stories, The Silence of Ordinary Things is a group exhibition broadly inspired by the work of The Mistake Room's 2015 Artist Honoree, Isaac Julien. The show unfolds as a series of focused snapshots composed through works that explore the dichotomy between the world of man and the natural environment; the presence and echoes of history in the now; the inherent nature of the political in the poetic; the representation of beauty and the body in the image; the impacts of the circulation of labor and capital in the digital age; and the revealing yet subtle qualities of the ordinary and the everyday. Through a choreography of voices and positions; of affinities and frictions, The Silence of Ordinary Things is a timely reflection on the poignant contradictions that define our current moment.

Participating Artists: Korakrit Arunanondchai, Edgar Arceneaux, Serge Attukwei Clottey, Sadie Barnette, Neil Beloufa, Ed Clark, William Cordova, Petra Cortright, Kenturah Davis, Marcel Dzama, Liz Glynn, Mario Garcia-Torres, Samara Golden, Sayre Gomez, David Hammons, Kenyatta AC Hinkle, JPW3, Isaac Julien, Glenn Kaino, Matsumi Kanemitsu, Lucia Koch, Samuel Levi Jones, Oscar Murilo, Jackie Nickerson, Eamon Ore-Giron, Neil Raitt, Fay Ray, Analia Saban, Aaron Sandnes, Eduardo Sarabia, Lorna Simpson, Melanie Smith, Vivian Suter, Henry Taylor, Diana Thater, Hank Willis Thomas, and Liat Yossifor.

The Silence of Ordinary Things is organized by The Mistake Room and curated by Cesar Garcia, TMR Director and Chief Curator, with Jamie Shi, TMR Special Projects Coordinator.

Special thanks to all the artists, galleries, and donors who contributed works for the TMR 2015 Benefit Exhibition.

Photo Credits: Kelly Barrie. Copyright 2015. The Mistake Room. 

 

Vivian Suter: Panajachel 

January 17 - March 14, 2015  

The daughter of European immigrants who arrived in Argentina in the late 1930’s, Vivian Suter was born in Buenos Aires in 1949. In 1962 she returned to Europe where she spent a majority of her youth living in Basel, Switzerland until 1983 when during a trip across North and Central America that included a brief stay in LA, she arrived in Panajachel—a small town on the northeastern shore of Guatemala’s Lake Atitlán that she has since then called home. Suter built a home and studio on a lush terrain that was formerly a coffee plantation and it was here that she began to create works that resulted from her immediate experiences within the landscape. Suter’s exhibition at The Mistake Room encompasses a large-scale installation inclusive of unstretched canvases, works on paper, floor pieces, and a hanging canopy of draping works that have come to anchor Suter’s oeuvre. Often deemed a landscape painter, Suter’s works in reality have shaped a unique genre of art-making altogether—one that negates the preciousness of the singular object and presents us with a recollection of vanishing images, surreal pictures, saturated stains, and forgotten objects that contemplate the space between our perceptions of nature and its actual realities.

 Vivian Suter: Panajachel is organized by The Mistake Room and curated by Cesar Garcia, TMR Director and Chief Curator.

The Mistake Room’s programs are made possible thanks to the generous support of its Board of Directors; Big Mistake Patron Group; Mistake Patron Group; Director’s Council; and Contemporary Council.

Special thanks to House of Gaga, Mexico City. 

Additional In-Kind Support Provided by House Beer, Chandon, and Terrazas de los Andes. 

Photo Credits: Kelly Barrie. Copyright 2015. The Mistake Room. 

 

Paulo Bruscky: Artist Books and Films, 1970-2013

January 17 - March 14, 2015  

A key participant in the international mail art movement, known in Brazil as arte correio, and known for his extensive Fluxus archive developed through networks with artists, Bruscky is a singular figure who has developed a radically innovative artistic practice. A life-long resident of Recife, Bruscky came of age during the military dictatorship— producing work that responded to the urgencies of the political situation with a signature sense of humor. Bruscky was among the first to explore new technologies like Xerox machines while creating unique distribution strategies for his work. Coining the term “communication art,” Bruscky utilized unorthodox channels for art-making as a means to subvert and transform the status quo. The exhibition at The Mistake Room focuses on the artist’s body of artist books and Super-8 films—a critical backbone of his rich and prolific practice. More than mere records of past actions, the works operate as foils for the activation of ideas and evidence of the individual passion and will to connect critically, poetically and artistically to the contemporary moment.

 Paulo Bruscky: Artist Books and Films, 1970-2013 is organized by The Mistake Room and Guest Curated by Clara M. Kim.

The Mistake Room’s programs are made possible thanks to the generous support of its Board of Directors; Big Mistake Patron Group; Mistake Patron Group; Director’s Council; and Contemporary Council.

 Special thanks to Galeria Nara Roesler and Fernando Abdalla.

 Additional In-Kind Support Provided by House Beer, Chandon, and Terrazas de los Andes.

 Photo Credits: Kelly Barrie. Copyright 2015. The Mistake Room. 

 

Ed Clark: A Thousand Lights of Sun

October 19 – December 20, 2014

A Thousand Lights of Sun brings together works spanning six decades of Ed Clark’s artistic career. The exhibition, Clark’s first institutional solo show in LA, focuses on two distinct spheres of the artist’s practice—his formal and technical contributions to abstract painting and his work’s relationship to site, traced through a series of pieces produced in different locales in which the artist has lived or worked. Born in the segregated South and raised in Chicago, Clark enlisted in the Air Force at the age of 17 at the height of WWII. After serving two years in the South Pacific Clark sought greater opportunities than were available to African-Americans in the US and he decided to move to Paris in 1952 with support from the GI Bill. He enrolled in L’Academie de la Grande Chaumiere and it was here that he began to develop a unique technical approach for his abstractions. Clark painted on the floor using an industrial broom, moving the paint across the canvas in sweeping strokes, experimenting with the palpable properties of paint and its effects. Upon his return to the US, he settled in New York City where he continues to live and work. Since the 1970s, Clark’s largely horizontal works have transformed significantly as he explores more intuitive and sporadic mark-making. He refined his painting techniques and played with the limits of the medium—Clark was one of the first artists to work with shaped canvases. The visceral textures of his early works have changed over the years—the more recent works indexing a passage of time and a transformation of Clark’s own body. Bringing together a wide range of paintings, studies on paper, and monumental unstretched works dating back to the late 1940’s, A Thousand Lights of Sun highlights Clark’s gestural versatility and sheds light on an under-represented but critically important figure of the Abstract Expressionist movement whose contributions continue to inform younger artists working today.

Ed Clark: A Thousand Lights of Sun is organized by The Mistake Room and curated by Cesar Garcia, Director and Chief Curator, with Grecia Santiesteban, Assistant Curator.

The Mistake Room’s programs are made possible thanks to the generous support of its Board of Directors; Big Mistake Patron Group; Mistake Patron Group; Director’s Council; and Contemporary Council.

Special thanks to David Hammons, AC Hudgins, Lauren Hudgins, Alexis Marcelo, Melanca Clark, and Tilton Gallery. 

Photo Credits: Peter Kirby. Copyright 2014. The Mistake Room. 

 

Matsumi Kanemitsu: Metamorphic Effects

October 5 – December 20, 2014

Metamorphic Effects will present a focused selection of paintings and works on paper spanning the career of Matsumi Kanemitsu, an artist raised in Japan who lived and worked in the United States. Having enlisted in the Army soon before the attack on Pearl Harbor, Kanemitsu began his artistic career in military detention—using materials donated by the Red Cross to ink his first works. Following a stay in Europe during which he met and worked with artists like Fernand Leger and Pablo Picasso, Kanemitsu came of age in New York during the 1950’s—counting artists like Franz Kline, Ad Reinhardt, and Jackson Pollock as his contemporaries. After coming to Los Angeles in 1961 to explore lithography at the renowned Tamarind Workshop, Kanemitsu made a life in this city, holding a host of academic appointments and influencing a generation of Angeleno creatives. Widely acknowledged as a gifted print maker, Kanemitsu was equally accomplished in other media. For the first time in nearly two decades, this exhibition will bring together spheres of his oeuvre that are less known—paintings on canvas, sumi ink and watercolor drawings, and intimate figurative drawings. Various of these works will be exhibited publicly for the very first time. Titled after a 1967 statement by the artist in which he declared: I want personal marks. Surface variations. Cubist and Oriental calligraphic space… Metamorphic effects, this exhibition highlights the ideas around painting and alchemy, form and cultural specificity that ground his practice. This presentation aims to reveal his mastery of the many media he explored and the multivalent moments of transformation, both grand and subtle, that define many of his works. Distinct bodies of drawings will anchor this show. Shown alongside paintings from different periods of his life, Kanemitsu’s sumi ink and watercolor drawings and his intimate, erotic, and often politically charged figurative ones, function as dramatic studies of color, line, and form that point to an alternate formal lineage for his abstractions. At the same time, these never before exhibited works bring to the surface a psychological complexity and textured approach to materiality that echoes throughout Kanemitsu’s practice; serving as a timely critical reflection about the conditions of painting at this particular historical moment.

Matsumi Kanemitsu: Metamorphic Effects is curated by Kris Kuramitsu, TMR Deputy Director and Senior Curator.

The Mistake Room’s programs are made possible thanks to the generous support of its Board of Directors; Big Mistake Patron Group; Mistake Patron Group; Director’s Council; and Contemporary Council.

Special thanks to Nancy Uyemura. 

Photo Credits: Peter Kirby. Copyright 2014. The Mistake Room. 

 

Korakrit Arunanondchai (feat. boychild): Letters to Chantri #1—The lady at the door/The gift that keeps on giving

July 18 – September 13, 2014 

Letters to Chantri #1—The lady at the door/The gift that keeps on giving marks Thailand-born, New York-based artist Korakrit Arunanondchai’s first solo show in Los Angeles and his first major institutional commission. This ambitious, newly-commissioned, large-scale work featuring performance artist boychild is the first part of a new long-term project by the artist envisioned as an ongoing series of shows— each conceived as a biographical vignette of a character that will form part of a broader cinematic narrative and ensemble in the artist’s future feature film. The exhibition at The Mistake Room, which merges the artist’s performance practice with his studio investigations in an exhibition context, is structured as a performative experience guided by two alternating actresses that the artist has collaborated with specifically for this presentation. Consolidating new paintings, sculptures, and videos into an immersive experiential installation, Arunanondchai blurs the boundary between ritual and guided exhibition tour; marking a drastic new approach to the presentation of his work. In this first vignette, Arunanondchai introduces the archetype of the young artist through the strategies and tactics mobilized in recent years by Eastern religions in their effort to deepen their relationship with a growing demographic of Thai youth. Heritage and tradition collapse into a world of anxiety, immediacy, deregulation, and detachment; a world where myths of innovation and notions of “the new” have become ideals of progress, and history is often only referenced as a passing side note. A video that mimics a late-night personal endorsement ad for an undefined product introduces the experience that is then followed by a timed group visit to an adjacent large-scale gathering site reminiscent of both a Buddhist temple and a futuristic luxury retail store where belonging is priced via a line of body cleansing products. As religion and consumption intertwine, historical processes are unpacked and exposed; rendering visible the transformation of spiritual faith into lifestyle brand that is occurring today in Thailand and beyond.

Korakrit Arunanondchai (feat. boychild): Letters to Chantri #1—The lady at the door/The gift that keeps on giving is another collaboration between Korakrit Arunanondchai and performance artist boychild; his brother Korapat Arunanondchai; producer Rory Mulhere; director of photography AJGvojic; composer Harry Bornstein; and Zanzie.

The exhibition is organized by The Mistake Room and curated by Cesar Garcia, TMR Director and Chief Curator.

The Mistake Room’s programs are made possible thanks to the generous support of its Board of Directors; Big Mistake Patron Group; Mistake Patron Group; Director’s Council; and Contemporary Council.

Additional support for the exhibition is provided by Alfonso Medina and T38 Studio; C L E A R I N G, New York/Brussels; and Carlos/Ishikawa, London.

Special support for the exhibition is provided by Jennifer Gross and David Koenig, Glenn Kaino, Jeff Ellermeyer, Mas Malo Restaurant, Andrea Zittel and High Desert Test Sites (HDTS), and Mieke Marple and Davida Nemeroff.

In-kind support for the exhibition is provided by Capture This NYC, Milk Studios, Cuervo, and Tecate.

Crew & Post-Production Team: Christian Amada, Taran Allen, Jared Corde, Jeff Tomcho

Cast: boychild, Cherisse Gray, Grecia Santiesteban, Jamie Shi, Liz Medina, Alexander Addington-White, Daniela Anastassiou, Meredith Argenzio, Korapat Arunanondchai, Genevieve Belleveau, David Bluer, Wilson Chang, Yue Du, Dana Eitches, Lauren Elder, Kelly Gazlay, Tara Grayson, Jesse Hoffman, Brian Khek, Katrina Lencek-Inagaki, Rachel Lord, Justin McCoy, Alli Miller, Alexandra Nazari, Diane Nguyen, Khoi Nguyen, Quam Odunsi, Natasha Roozrokh, Mark Ruksook, Michelle Schultz, Eden Solas, Aurora Tang,  Sarah Velasco, Elaine Wang, Jee-Shaun Wang, Mansa S. Williamson, Ching Wong, Vanessa Zendejas, and Jessica Ziskind. 

Photo Credits: Josh White/JW Pictures. Copyright 2014; and Peter Kirby, Copyright 2014. The Mistake Room. 

 

Oscar Murillo: Distribution Center

January 18 – April 12, 2014

Distribution Center is The Mistake Room’s inaugural exhibition and Oscar Murillo’s first institutional solo exhibition in the United States. Produced across three continents and presented in TMR’s 4,500 square foot warehouse space, prior to its formal renovation, Murillo’s project approached the site of its presentation as a physical and conceptual structure through which making can be explored—as a form of work; as a process, within and beyond aesthetics; and as a means of living. Using the space as a work site over a series of residency periods in LA, Murillo processed large quantities of various materials that have come to anchor the visual language of his practice—paper, canvas, wood, concrete, metal—giving way to objects, both finished and unfinished, that in the context of the installation aim to interrogate the boundaries between artworks and commodities as they subtly unveil poignant relationships between art-making and economies sustained by manual labor, manufacturing, and mass distribution. The results of Murillo’s multiple work processes, aided at times by local day laborers and collaborating carpenters and construction workers in Tijuana, Mexico, are presented alongside a selection of videos that situate labor as visual imagery and as a set of embodied social and cultural interactions—drawing our attention to seemingly disparate systems of production that in reality are intricately related through the shared histories, cultural customs and ways of living that they help concretize across geographies.

Oscar Murillo: Distribution Center is organized by The Mistake Room and curated by Cesar Garcia, The Mistake Room’s Founding Director and Chief Curator.

The Mistake Room’s programs are made possible thanks to the generous support of its Board of Directors; Big Mistake Patron Group; Mistake Patron Group; Director’s Council; and Contemporary Council.

Additional support for this exhibition is provided by Alfonso Medina and T38 Studio.

Special thanks to David Zwirner, New York/London, Carlos/Ishikawa, London, and Isabella Bortolozzi Galerie, Berlin. 

Photo Credits: Josh White/JW Pictures. Copyright 2014. The Mistake Room.